Tag Archives: milk

Combatting Antibiotics in the Milk Supply: Nelson-Jameson and DSM Launch a New Delvotest® Support Site

milkNelson-Jameson, Inc. and DSM are proud to announce a new Delvotest® Antibiotic Residue Tests website! Geared towards meeting the needs of dairy farmers, dairy labs, and artisan/farmstead operations, the site features information on an array of kits, troubleshooting tips, and order links.

As part of our mutual commitment to food safety, Nelson-Jameson, Inc. and DSM sought to create a site where users in the Americas could learn more about the dangers of antibiotic residues in milk and how to most effectively select and utilize Delvotest® products to both protect the public health and the economic vitality of their dairy/cheese operations.

To check out the Delvotest® site you can click here, enter “nelsonjameson.com/delvotest” into your web browser, or find the page under “Our Specialties” on our main page at here.

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Don’t Have a Cow

FAO-Infographic-milk-facts-en

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nelson-Jameson, Inc. began as a dairy-centric business almost 70 years ago and, while we’ve since branched into all sectors of the food and beverage processing industries, we still consider ourselves experts in all-things-dairy.

Global dairy consumption is expected to grow by 36% in the next decade, largely driven by emerging markets. To satisfy this demand and other culturally-based needs, consumers and processors are looking beyond the traditional dairy cow to other milk-producing animals such as camels, goats, sheep and buffaloes.

Hump Day Every Day
Camel milk has long been a staple in arid regions in the Middle East, Asia and Africa where bovine farming is considered too water-intensive. It has more fat and protein than cow’s milk, and is lower in cholesterol than cow or goat milk. Proponents of Camel milk assert that the milk’s naturally anti-inflammatory properties can improve brain function for those that suffer from Autism and ADHD, and that it may promote the healing of diabetic wounds. You’ll pay a premium for these benefits, however—camel milk is currently being sold in select Whole Foods and other supermarkets for $18/16oz.

Get Your Goat (and Sheep)
Although goat cheese and sheep’s milk cheese have been regularly consumed in the United States for quite some time, their fluid milk is only now beginning to gain popularity with Americans. Globally, their milk has been consumed for thousands of years, as both sheep and goats were among the earliest animals domesticated by humans. Goat’s milk has more calcium, potassium and vitamin A than cow’s milk, and is also easier to digest because of its lower level of lactose. Sheep’s milk is similar to the mineral and vitamin content in goat’s milk, but also has more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) than both cow’s and goat’s milk. CLA has been shown to help reduce cancerous tumors, lower blood pressure and reduce body fat.

Buffalo Swills
Water, Swamp and River Buffaloes are responsible for a significant amount of the world’s milk production, second only to dairy cattle. Although buffaloes have a significantly longer production life than cows, they also have longer “dry” periods, produce less milk and are more sensitive to the milking process. 95% of the dairy buffalo population is located in Asia, and the largest buffalo milk producers are in India and Pakistan. Although buffalo milk is often made into cheese, ghee or yogurt, its use as a beverage has recently gained popularity outside of Asia. Buffalo milk is lower in cholesterol than cow’s milk, and is thicker and creamier due to a higher fat and calorie content. Also, because of its high peroxidase activity, buffalo milk can be preserved naturally for a longer period than cow’s milk.

A Moo Frontier
While camels, goats, sheep and buffaloes are the more common animal-based sources of milk outside of cows, other animals like donkeys, horses, reindeer, and yaks are farmed for milk as well. Donkey milk in particular has been enjoying a newfound popularity, partially due to mainstream news articles touting it as “the elixer of life” and “the next big thing”, as well as Pope Francis giving it his holy stamp of approval.  Hey, if it’s good enough for the pope, I guess we could give alternative animal milk a try too.

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Fluid Milk: Market and Generational Differences Are Influencing Consumption

Milk GlassThe publication of the USDA’s “Why Are Americans Consuming Less Fluid Milk?   A Look at Generational Differences in Intake Frequency” this May has lead to frank discussion in the dairy industry. Citing a ‘“slow continuous shift downward’ in milk drinking since the 1940s,” the report analyzes the causes and potential effects of this downward trend. The trend has been especially felt significantly in the last several decades: “Since 1970 alone, per capita fluid milk consumption has fallen from 0.96 cup-equivalents to about 0.61 cup-equivalents per day”.

So, what is going on here?  The authors point to several issues that have energized this trend including the following: frequency of consumption, a diversified marketplace, and generational differences. In regards to frequency, Americans “have become less apt to drink fluid milk at mealtimes, especially with midday and nighttime meals, reducing the total number of consumption occasions.” Part of the reason the frequency has decreased is due to an expanding array of beverage options that are out there for the average consumer.

Milk has been displaced by the consumption of energy drinks, sodas, juices, tea, coffee, etc. The current market offers a wide selection of beverages, choices, and purported claims. For younger consumers this variety and choice is something they have always known, unlike older consumers who remember fewer choices and a lack of access to Taurine-infused energy drinks, iced teas, iced coffee drinks, chocolate soy milk, etc. Continue reading

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The Dairy Security Act: An Examination of the Debate

Milk Glass

If you have seen “Goodlatte” in the news lately, it might not be in reference to Starbucks. Instead, Reps. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va and David Scott, D-Ga are in the news due to their proposed “Dairy Freedom Act.” In response to the Dairy Security Act, the proposed Act, according to the Capital Press, offers margin insurance for “producers to reduce catastrophic losses. But it does so without a milk supply-management element.” Numerous manufacturers and retailers have signed on in support of the proposed Act, including the National Grocers Association, the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association, in addition to many more.

Despite these endorsements, the Act has also drawn some criticism.   A piece on the PR Newswire explains: “Opponents of supply management believe it would increase domestic prices on dairy products above international prices, make the American dairy industry less competitive and bring more government regulation and intervention into milk markets.”  Those opposed to the Act include the National Milk Producers Federation.

As a producer, processor, retailer, etc., you can check in with your respective professional organization(s) for their stance on the debate. Rep. Goodlatte has provided a link to the complete text on his website.  You can access that link here.

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