Tag Archives: Learning Center

From the Learning Center: Choosing the Right Cheese Packaging

pic14524There is no such thing as a “good” bag or “bad” bag. In cheese packaging, what matters is whether the bag works for your particular application.

  • Prior to using a particular cheese bag on a regular basis, you should “qualify” the bag for your process. That means running a small number of bags on machinery under standard conditions. Ideally, technical experts from your bag vendor should be present during the trial run.
  • Examine the package for an adequate, leak-proof seal. Put it through your standard storage and distribution process. Only then can you be confident that this particular bag works with your manufacturing process.
  • If anything in your process changes, you should re-qualify your packaging material. In order to keep your cost as low as possible, packaging materials are usually designed with a very small margin of error. Even something as simple as a new sealing bar can be reason for re-qualifying your packaging material. This gives you the best guarantee that the manufacturer will stand behind the bag in the event of a failure. Getting the manufacturer’s agreement in advance that their bags are qualified for use in your process will protect you and reduce the possibility of disputes later on.

For more information about packaging, click here.

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: All About Coagulants

DairyVital to the cheese-making process, coagulants cause milk to separate into curds and whey. Although acid alone is used to coagulate some “fresh” cheeses, such as cottage cheese; the traditional cheese-making coagulants are enzymes. The main source until recent times has been rennet extracted from the abomasum or fourth stomach of the calf. Its principal enzyme is called rennin or chymosin.

Chymosin added to milk, cleaves a specific peptide bond in casein, the most important milk protein. Casein, which exists in complexes called micelles, has four components. One of these, kappacasein, stabilizes the whole complex against coagulation, an action caused by the flocculating effect of calcium ions. When chymosin splits kappacasein, the rest of the casein micelle becomes unstable. It coagulates – or gels – due to the presence of calcium in the milk.

Coagulation of milk depends on the pH, temperature, casein, and calcium content. As a coagulant, chymosin has shown distinct advantages over other proteolytic enzymes (pepsin, trypsin and papain) in producing a smooth, high-yielding curd, free from bitterness or off-flavors. High chymosin content in rennet has been shown in studies to produce better cheese yields.

Nelson-Jameson offers a variety of enzymes suitable for commercial production of cheese. They are microbial coagulants and 100% pure chymosin produced by r-DNA fermentation technology. Call our ingredient product specialists for more information or an in-plant trial at 800-826-8302.

For information on Coagulants, click here.

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: Lab Reagents Safety

MP900386203Nelson-Jameson, Inc. has the largest collection of reagents assembled exclusively for food & dairy testing laboratories. Reagent chemicals should be handled only by qualified individuals trained in laboratory procedures and familiar with their potential hazards. “Right to Know” laws make it mandatory that anyone handling a hazardous substance be informed of the health hazards and safety precautions associated with that chemical.

Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS) are provided by Nelson-Jameson as required by OSHA’s Hazard Communication Law for products designed as hazardous. Our automated system assures that you will receive an MSDS with your first purchase of that hazardous item. You may also contact us to request MSDS information on any of our products you are currently using. The absence of a warning, however, must not be interpreted as an indication of safety.

For more information on our Laboratory Reagents, click here.

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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