Tag Archives: Learning Center

From the Learning Center: Valve Selection

ButterflyValveNelson-Jameson has a wide variety of valves to offer our customers. The following list presents some criteria to help identify a suitable valve for a given application or service:

Fluid Service
The type of fluid, whether it is a gas, liquid, slurry, clean, abrasive, etc… determines the type of valves to be chosen. The chemistry of the fluid service determines the material of construction to be chosen for the valve.

Pressure and Temperature Conditions
Operating pressures and temperature conditions will affect the type of valve and material of construction to be chosen.

Line Size
The line size can be a crucial factor in determining the valve type. For very large pipes, compact valves such as butterfly valves may be chosen at times due to smaller size and weight. Availability of a particular type valve for the chosen line size is also an important factor. All types of valves may not be available for the chosen line size.

Throttling (controlling flow) Characteristics
Only some types of valves offer good throttling characteristics (e.g. globe or diaphragm valves).

Pressure Drop
Larger pressure drops increase the pumping cost. Smaller pressure drops increase the valve cost because a larger valve would be needed.

Special Functional Requirements
The actual function for which the valve is required may allow for special criteria in selecting the valve. For example, if the application requires the valve to open quickly, a ball valve would be a good fit.

Please consider these criteria to select the valve that is right for you. For further assistance, please contact our Process Flow Department at 800-826-8302.

To shop our selection of valves available online, click here.

Source: Engineering Design Encyclopedia

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: All About Sanitary Gaskets

26494Our flexible, non-toxic gasket compounds meet FDA specifications for direct contact with dairy products and edible oils, as well as 3-A, USDA and NSF criteria. They will not absorb taste or odors. Low-swell characteristics make them ideal for exposure to oils, steam and water.

Buna-N: Our most popular gasket material. Also called nitrile or NBR, this oil-resistant rubber compound has excellent compression set, tear and abrasion resistance. Ozone degrades Buna-N, so don’t store gaskets near electric motors and other ozone sources.

EPDM: Good for steam/hot water service. This rubber compound has good resistance to animal and vegetable oils,mild acids, dilute alkalies, silicone oils and greases, phosphates, esters, ketones and alcohols. Not recommended for petroleum oils or diester-based lubricants. Resists water absorption.

Viton: With one of the best fluid resistance characteristics of any commercial elastomer, Viton is particularly resistant to oils, fuels, lubricants and most mineral acids. Viton withstands high temperatures and retains good mechanical properties, oil and chemical resistance. Remains usefully elastic indefinately in air oven testing up to 400°F or, intermittently to 500°F. Excellent for steam service.

Silicone: Outstanding low-temperature flexibility. This rubber compound resists lubrication, animal and vegetable oils, most dilute acids and alkalies. Excellent ozone and weathering resistance. Also resists many solvents that can cause excess swelling.

Teflon: A plastic with an outstanding temperature range. Resists all chemicals except alakali metals, fluorine and some fluorinated chemicals. Because it is not a rubber compound, it will not return to its original shape when compressed. Envelope gaskets of Teflon with a rubber core are available to solve this problem.
Note: Listed by size of tube OD, not by ID/OD of gasket. Call our gasket and O-ring product specialists with questions. Gaskets sold individually, but order in package quantities for more economical pricing.

For more information on gaskets, click here.

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: Proper Care & Cleaning Sani-Safe® Cutlery

23644Our line of Sani-Safe knives offer the weight and balance of wood-handled knives with the sanitary advantage of polypropylene. We recommend adherence to the following guidelines to maximize the performance of Sani-Safe® Cutlery.

  • Cutlery should be hand washed in mild to medium strength detergent and towel-dried.
  • Knives should NOT be placed in automatic dishwashers. The blade edges will be dulled from rubbing against each other, and caustic detergents will cause staining and pitting of the blade.
  • Cutlery should NOT be soaked for long periods or submerged for cleaning. If soaking cutlery in soap, bleach or chlorine, the soaking should be kept to a minimum, the products rinsed thoroughly and dried immediately.
  • Chlorine and bleach discolor and pit stain-free and high-carbon steel. If chlorine or bleach products come in contact with the blade, they must be thoroughly rinsed off immediately.
  • When cutlery is left to soak in aluminum pans or stainless steel sinks, galvanic action, the transfer of electrons from one metal to another may occur. Galvanic action may cause pitting on cutlery blades. To prevent it, avoid long periods of soaking and remove cutlery from condiments such as mayonnaise when they are kept in aluminum or stainless steel pans.

Only frequent and prompt cleaning of cutlery after each use with non-caustic solutions and prompt towel drying will ensure the performance and beauty of superior Sani-Safe® cutlery products.

For more information on Sani-Safe® Cutlery, click here.

 About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: Footbath Tips

NJ_Disinfectant Mat Flyer.QXDSome plant managers complain that employees don’t use them. Others say that they don’t get cleaned out often enough. Or, the sanitizing solution loses effectiveness, creating a source of contamination. Yes, these things can happen…but they don’t have to. Each of these problems has a simple answer. Quality assurance techniques require monitoring. Disinfectant Mats, by themselves, don’t create a sanitation program.

We can help you make it work. Because Nelson-Jameson has been in the business for so long, we’ve got some suggestions that have worked well for others: 

  • Have enough Disinfectant Mats so that employees don’t need to go out of their way to use one. Locate them at every entrance to processing areas.
  • If employees bypass footbaths, put several together to cover the whole entrance…so they can’t avoid them.
  • Limit access to processing areas, keeping drivers, warehouse workers and office personnel out, if possible.
  • Initiate a footwear and clothing program – work clothes and boots should stay at work.
  • Education is a powerful sanitation tool, so talk to employees about the problem.
  • Post “Use Footbath” signs as reminders to employees.
  • Check sanitizer concentration with test strips, which are convenient and simple. Keep daily or hourly log of results.
  • Replace regular mats with the Antimicrobial Disinfectant Mat.
  • Use longer lasting sanitizing solutions. Chlorine bleach dissipates rapidly, especially in the presence of a heavy organic soil load. Other compounds will last longer. Try quaternary ammonium, iodine, chlorine or acid sanitizers.
  • Don’t forget other aspects of your program, such as air sampling, HACCP, surface sampling, insect control, drain cleaning, condensation control, and cleaning of drip pans, condensers and air filters.

For more information on disinfectant mats, click here.

 About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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From the Learning Center: Cut-Resistant Ratings

17459In the food industry and many other industries for that matter, employees work around sharp and abrasive objects. To protect hands from injury, many employees wear cut-resistant gloves – but not all cut-resistant gloves are created equal.

This list below shows how resistant a material is to cuts when exposed to a cutting edge under specific loads.  ANSI results are provided in terms of grams of weight applied to the specific material being tested. The number represents the weight needed to cut through material with 25mm of blade travel. Notice that cut levels range from 0 to 5, with 5 being the best.

ANSI cut level 0        <200
ANSI cut level 1        >200
ANSI cut level 2        >500
ANSI cut level 3        >1000
ANSI cut level 4        >1500
ANSI cut level 5        >3500

For more information on our cut-resistant gloves, click here.

About Our Learning Center
To make informed decisions in the food, dairy and beverage industries, you need to have in-depth product knowledge and a variety of educational resources. Our Learning Center is designed to help you with all that. Visit our Learning Center today!

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