Tag Archives: food processing

Midwest Food Processors Association

The MWFPA annual convention/tradeshow provides attendees with unparalleled opportunities to network with a cross-seciton of key industry players while providing access to critical information about trends and developments in the food manufacturing industry.

For more information: http://www.mwfpa.org/events

Tags: , ,

Turbidity Monitoring: Recover More Product & Save Money

With constant eyes on profit margins, processors strive to make every dollar count on the processing line. Are you trying to figure out your next continuous improvement project aimed at maximizing profits for your operations? Turbidity monitoring from Anderson-Negele can help to maximize profits while saving money on wasted product going down the drain during cleaning cycles.

How it works:

Turbidity is defined as, “the phenomenon where by a specific portion of a light beam passing through a specific liquid medium is reflected by undissolved particles.” Basically, the sensor acts like a flashlight into the light stream and senses the light that comes back due to being reflected by undissolved particles. For example, purified water would have a very low value of turbidity due to most impurities being removed. However, an ice cream mix would have a high turbidity value because it is largely made up of undissolved particles.

Common applications where constant turbidity monitoring can greatly assist operations include:

Some of these processes can be regulated by a timer or sight from the wash streams that usually go down the drain and produce more wastewater, which also raises costs to the processor. Anderson-Negele offers a line of turbidity sensors to improve product yield and reduce waste. By setting a threshold on a turbidity monitor and relaying it back to a PLC you can put more control on a process and regulate product going down the drain.

Take a look at Nelson-Jameson’s offering of turbidity monitors, or call our Instrumentation Specialists for more information.

Tags: , , ,

Process Expo 2017

PROCESS EXPO is the largest trade show in North America dedicated exclusively to the global food and beverage industry. Spanning the entire spectrum of the food and beverage industry, tens of thousands of professionals come to this biennial event in search of the latest innovations in food processing and packaging technology for their business.

Come visit us at this year’s show in the North Hall, Booth 2646!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Midwest Food Processors Association Convention

MWFPA-logo-directory2010LG-285x235The MWFPA annual convention/tradeshow provides attendees with unparalleled opportunities to network with a cross-seciton of key industry players while providing access to critical information about trends and developments in the food manufacturing industry.

For more information: http://www.mwfpa.org/events

 

Tags: , , ,

Foodborne Bacteria: Do You Know How They Grow?

Food safety concerns are on all food manufacturers’ minds (and, honestly, probably in their dreams too), so it is critical to know how bacteria grow.  Armed with that knowledge, we are better able to stay ahead of bacterial contamination in the food manufacturing facilities.

Petri dish with bacteria.

Petri dish with bacteria. Source: processingmagazine.com

Often, when I was in the plant environment, I would refer back to a case study put together by the Royal Society for Public Health in 2010. It laid out some excellent basics on growth factors for bacteria in a concise manner that readers of The Wide Line may appreciate.

The RSPH states, “In order to grow, bacteria require a source of nutrients, an appropriate atmosphere, neutral or alkaline conditions, available moisture and an appropriate temperature. (In turn), the nutrient source needs to have available moisture, a source of energy, nitrogen, vitamins, and minerals.” A large number of bacteria are able to grow with or without oxygen. Some bacteria (obligate aerobes), will only grow if oxygen is present. Other bacteria (obligate anaerobes) will only grow in the absence of oxygen.

The RSPH’s “Growth Requirements of Bacteria” section continues: “Most bacteria grow best in a neutral or alkaline environment. Bacteria do not grow well in foods which are too acidic (with a pH of less than 4.5).”  So, the more acidic the food, the less likely it is to support the growth of bacteria.  In addition, foods that are dried or high in salt or sugar have a reduction in available moisture content, and bacteria will grow poorly on these foods.

Finally, “Most bacteria will not grow in cold conditions, or will only grow and divide slowly. High temperatures will also inhibit the growth of bacteria.”  For example, most food poisoning bacteria die when exposed to a temperature of 70°C for two minutes or more. The optimum temperature range for the growth of most bacteria is 5°C to 63°C, which is known as the ‘temperature danger zone’.

The RSPH concisely acknowledges that there are multiple areas in all food production facilities that need to be assessed for risk regularly, as well as monitored daily in order to prevent microbiological product contamination. All processing steps have the potential to increase the chance of microbial corruption.  Nelson-Jameson carries food safety products that assist with control and surveillance in every step of the production process—from ingredient receiving through manufacturing, storage, and shipping of finished products.  Contact a sales representative today to find out how Nelson-Jameson can help strengthen your food safety prevention and protocol.

Tags: , , , , ,