Category: Cheese & Dairy Products

Happy Planuary

Source: American Institute for Cancer Research

Source: American Institute for Cancer Research

Although January isn’t the beginning of our fiscal year, it’s still a month of forecasts, resolutions, predictions and plans. Lots of plans. Basically, it’s Planuary. The strategic mapping of the future can seem tedious to some, but as trend-watchers, it’s one of our favorite months of the year. Planuary’s the time when industry media, food experts and food processors cast their predictions for what food and beverages will be hot in food service and food retail. So, what will we be eating and drinking in 2016?

Building Blocks
Two of the cornerstone components of balanced nutrition will be in the spotlight this year: fat and protein. The consumer view on fat has come “full-circle”, according to one industry expert. Fat is no longer looked at as necessarily unhealthy, as consumers look towards cleaner labels, more natural ingredients, increased satiety and maintaining balanced diets. Nuts, seeds, avocados and plant-based oils are increasingly popular, as are full-fat dairy products. In fact, butter sales over the last couple of years have been the highest in decades. Rendered chicken fat, beef tallow and pork fat are also gaining traction. Basically, fat is back in all its glory, and our taste buds couldn’t be happier.

Protein, a hot trend over the past decade or so, shows no sign of slowing down. Plant-based protein will be especially big in 2016, with oat-, pea- and soy- proteins all gaining market favor. Nuts, seeds and grains will also be big. The Middle Eastern staple Freekah and the ancient grain Amaranth are vying to be the new quinoa. Mushrooms, an often overlooked source of protein, are set to have a big year as well—domestic production and value are currently at an all-time high. Look for our favorite fungi to be blended into both meat- and plant-based dishes and products with more frequency. Looks like 2016 will be protein-packed and health-focused!

Playing Cooking with Fire
Grillmasters rejoice—this is your year. “Charred”, “burnt”, “grilled” and “fire-roasted” will popping up on menus and in stores across the US. Cocktails, entrees and desserts are all getting their smoke on, as consumers gravitate toward more unique and stronger flavors. Look for this fire-fad to develop into a full-on trend, as it can be applied to almost any food or beverage in various ways.

Take Your Pulse(s)
No, not that pulse. In culinary terms, pulses are lentils, dry beans, beans, and chickpeas. The United Nations is so certain that pulses will soon peak in popularity that it has dubbed 2016 the “International Year of Pulses”. Pulses already make up 75 percent of the average diet in developing countries, but only 25 percent in developed countries. The UN is hoping to change that with increased awareness, as pulses pack almost as much protein as meat per ounce, use less water to produce than meat and are relatively inexpensive. So, it’s a nutritional, sustainability and economic win-win-win.

Pop Pop Fizz Fizz
Bubbly beverages and tangy drinks are predicted to be quite “pop”-ular in 2016. Fermented beverages containing probiotics like kefir and kombucha are carving permanent space on grocery shelves, and hard sodas and ciders are increasing in popularity with the millennial generation. Drinking vinegars are even gaining a strong following. Sounds like sour pusses and puckered pouts will be a frequent expression for many consumers this year.

All of these macro- and micro- trends boil down to three main drivers: flavor, adventure and health. We’ll be watching these and other trends closely over the next year so that we can better anticipate the needs of our customers. Nelson-Jameson’s looking forward to a successful and productive 2016!

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Tech Tip: QMI® Aseptic Sampling Installation

qmi-tank-fittingNumerous customers use QMI® Aseptic Sampling products for process monitoring. QMI products are popular due to ease-of-use and a design to prevent environmental contamination of the sample. When installing equipment in process lines and tightening nuts, some people show off their muscle strength with too much torque. Other people don’t want to use a wrench.

Our tip for installing the QMI Aseptic Samplers is: use a wrench for a happy medium of torque. First, hand tighten the nut. Next, use a wrench for an additional 1/8th turn of the nut. Not too little, not too much. Then you are ready to take an aseptic sample!


Combatting Antibiotics in the Milk Supply: Nelson-Jameson and DSM Launch a New Delvotest® Support Site

milkNelson-Jameson, Inc. and DSM are proud to announce a new Delvotest® Antibiotic Residue Tests website! Geared towards meeting the needs of dairy farmers, dairy labs, and artisan/farmstead operations, the site features information on an array of kits, troubleshooting tips, and order links.

As part of our mutual commitment to food safety, Nelson-Jameson, Inc. and DSM sought to create a site where users in the Americas could learn more about the dangers of antibiotic residues in milk and how to most effectively select and utilize Delvotest® products to both protect the public health and the economic vitality of their dairy/cheese operations.

To check out the Delvotest® site you can click here, enter “nelsonjameson.com/delvotest” into your web browser, or find the page under “Our Specialties” on our main page at here.

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Nelson-Jameson Inc., Kaestner LLC, and Valcour Process Technologies enter partnership to bring expanded offerings to the U.S. Cheese and Dairy Production Markets

MARSHFIELD, WIS., October 8, 2015 – Nelson-Jameson — one of the largest distributors to the US cheese production market — and its sister company Kaestner LLC — a field service, PM programs, and project solutions provider — are entering a strategic partnership with Valcour Process Technologies. Valcour specializes in offering process technologies, equipment, systems, lines, and project solutions for the cheese, yogurt, and dairy production markets.

Valcour will be working directly with the sales teams at Nelson-Jameson and Kaestner to expand their market reach and breadth of offering to customers. Kaestner will also offer services, spare parts, and preventative maintenance programs to Valcour to better serve their customers.

All three companies will work together to provide better solutions to cheese manufacturers.

Nelson-Jameson, Inc. has been an integrated supplier for the food industry since 1947. Product lines include safety & personnel, production & material handling, sanitation & janitorial, processing & flow control, laboratory & QA/QC, and bulk packaging & ingredients. The company is headquartered in Marshfield, Wisconsin, with other locations in Turlock, California; Twin Falls, Idaho; York, Pennsylvania; Dumas, Texas; and Chicago, Illinois. For more information visit, www.nelsonjameson.com.


Don’t Have a Cow

FAO-Infographic-milk-facts-en

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nelson-Jameson, Inc. began as a dairy-centric business almost 70 years ago and, while we’ve since branched into all sectors of the food and beverage processing industries, we still consider ourselves experts in all-things-dairy.

Global dairy consumption is expected to grow by 36% in the next decade, largely driven by emerging markets. To satisfy this demand and other culturally-based needs, consumers and processors are looking beyond the traditional dairy cow to other milk-producing animals such as camels, goats, sheep and buffaloes.

Hump Day Every Day
Camel milk has long been a staple in arid regions in the Middle East, Asia and Africa where bovine farming is considered too water-intensive. It has more fat and protein than cow’s milk, and is lower in cholesterol than cow or goat milk. Proponents of Camel milk assert that the milk’s naturally anti-inflammatory properties can improve brain function for those that suffer from Autism and ADHD, and that it may promote the healing of diabetic wounds. You’ll pay a premium for these benefits, however—camel milk is currently being sold in select Whole Foods and other supermarkets for $18/16oz.

Get Your Goat (and Sheep)
Although goat cheese and sheep’s milk cheese have been regularly consumed in the United States for quite some time, their fluid milk is only now beginning to gain popularity with Americans. Globally, their milk has been consumed for thousands of years, as both sheep and goats were among the earliest animals domesticated by humans. Goat’s milk has more calcium, potassium and vitamin A than cow’s milk, and is also easier to digest because of its lower level of lactose. Sheep’s milk is similar to the mineral and vitamin content in goat’s milk, but also has more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) than both cow’s and goat’s milk. CLA has been shown to help reduce cancerous tumors, lower blood pressure and reduce body fat.

Buffalo Swills
Water, Swamp and River Buffaloes are responsible for a significant amount of the world’s milk production, second only to dairy cattle. Although buffaloes have a significantly longer production life than cows, they also have longer “dry” periods, produce less milk and are more sensitive to the milking process. 95% of the dairy buffalo population is located in Asia, and the largest buffalo milk producers are in India and Pakistan. Although buffalo milk is often made into cheese, ghee or yogurt, its use as a beverage has recently gained popularity outside of Asia. Buffalo milk is lower in cholesterol than cow’s milk, and is thicker and creamier due to a higher fat and calorie content. Also, because of its high peroxidase activity, buffalo milk can be preserved naturally for a longer period than cow’s milk.

A Moo Frontier
While camels, goats, sheep and buffaloes are the more common animal-based sources of milk outside of cows, other animals like donkeys, horses, reindeer, and yaks are farmed for milk as well. Donkey milk in particular has been enjoying a newfound popularity, partially due to mainstream news articles touting it as “the elixer of life” and “the next big thing”, as well as Pope Francis giving it his holy stamp of approval.  Hey, if it’s good enough for the pope, I guess we could give alternative animal milk a try too.

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