Category: Press Room

Acceptance of Shipment Do’s and Don’ts

Inspection of product upon receipt from the carrier is a good practice for any facility, and can prevent questions, claim denial, and problems down the road. Here are a few tips to help everyone have a better experience:

  1. When a carrier calls to set up an appointment, be sure you can accept the freight within 72 hours of the call.
    1. Carriers will often charge storage fees after that time. $25 per day is not uncommon. In some cases, the freight may be returned to the shipper.
    2. Make a realistic appointment. Be sure you can keep that appointment.  In some cases a “re-delivery” charge is assessed if the driver arrives and cannot unload or make contact with anyone.
    3. If the carrier misses their appointment, they will not credit for the missed delivery. In most cases, the driver will arrive later or the next day.
  1. Check the driver’s delivery receipt.
    1. Is this shipment yours?
    2. Is all the required information/documentation present? I.e.: Purchase order, freight terms, number of pieces, cartons, or pallets, etc.

NOTE: If signing for pallets, a pallet may not contain ALL of your products/order. Likewise product contained within may have damage that is not visible.

  1. When receiving freight, inspect for any kind of damage and note the damage on the delivery receipt. Rubber stamping or writing “SUBJECT TO INSPECTION”, “SUBJECT TO COUNT”, Or “RECEIVED”, has no legal bearing. Failure to note damage or shortage at time of receipt greatly reduces the chance of collecting on a freight claim.
    1. Reviewing the packing list with the physical product will need to be done to determine if you are missing anything. If there is product missing or damaged and you have already signed for the pallet(s) – this is considered “Concealed” loss/damage.
    2. This type of loss must be identified and reported immediately to carrier or shipper. As of April 2015, carriers must only give a maximum of 5 days for claimant to report damage after signature is obtained. Once this timeframe has expired, claims are denied immediately.
  1. Be specific in your notation: crushed corner, broken arm, forklift damage through center of boxes, wetness stains, leaking, etc.
    1. Don’t allow the driver to hurry or pressure you into signing their delivery receipt before you have inspected.
    2. Don’t accept driver tallies or counts.
    3. Don’t make notations that relate to your opinion of the cause of damage.
  1. Look for torn or disturbed shrink wrap or boxes with the arrows pointing down instead of up. These could all be signs that your shipment sustained damage in transit and was restacked later.
    1. If you suspect damage, open the carton or crate and inspect it in the driver’s presence.
    2. Make notation of inspection including the specific items, damage sustained, and quantity of said items on the delivery receipt. Include driver’s name if possible.
    3. Take a picture or several pictures of the damage. Be sure to include any signage on the pallet/product. I.e.: Do not double stack, Fragile, This Side Up, Etc. Take a picture of the signed Delivery Receipt or Bill of Lading document with the damage/loss noted. In the case of electronic signatures, Electronic signature software DOES allow for comments to be made regarding condition of product. Take a picture of the notation on the scanner.
  1. Keep all packing materials in the condition upon arrival. DO NOT DISPOSE OF OR DESTROY THE PACKAGING.
    1. This will be needed as often inspections are conducted by the carrier.
    2. Without all the packaging, the carrier might determine the cause of damage was insufficient packaging and the claim will be denied.
  1. If the item being received has been damaged to the point where it cannot be used, then refuse to accept the delivery from the carrier and contact the shipper immediately. Again, be sure to notate on the delivery receipt the reason for refusal. Be specific.
    1. Refusal of a shipment without just cause will result in return charges being assessed.
    2. These charges may be passed onto the customer without specific cause noted on the delivery receipt.
    3. Before refusing, contact your shipper to identify any consequences of refusal.
  1. If an inspector from the carrier arrives to assess the damage, be sure there is a representative from your company present for the inspection.
    1. Generally inspection reports must have a signature of agreement from the recipient.
    2. Be sure you agree with all the facts in the report before signing.
  1. If an inspector wants to remove the damage product without an inspection report being filed or signed, you have the right to refuse, however carriers often give one chance to inspect and if denied, the claim is subsequently denied.
    1. Ask the inspector for a copy of the report when finished and contact the shipper to determine your role and what has been arranged.
  1. Using collect accounts often leaves the sole responsibility of a claim on the recipient. Be sure you understand all the consequences of shipping via collect.

Become a “Preventive Controls Qualified Individual” Today!

In Nelson-Jameson’s continued commitment to provide industry professionals with the latest in food science and food safety education, we’ve partnered with Cherney Microbiological Services to offer a brand new course offering!  The upcoming “FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food” is a class that will be of special interest to those in plant operations, and will focus on Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) compliance.  As an added bonus, Nelson-Jameson customers will receive a 5% discount, simply by mentioning “Nelson Jameson” when registering!

Image courtesy Cherney Microbiological Services.

Continuing Food Safety Education through FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food course

The Food Safety Modernization Act is the most extensive change to food safety laws in 70 years, shifting the industry perspective from a reactive to a proactive approach when addressing and preventing food contamination. The new regulations require specified activities to be completed by a “Preventive Controls Qualified Individual” who has “successfully completed training in the development and application of risk-based preventive controls.” The FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food course helps support both compliance with FSMA and provides FDA-recognized training for your designated Preventive Controls Qualified Individual. This standardized course was developed by the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance (FSPCA) in partnership with the FDA, and the lead instructors and course content and materials are FSPCA-approved.

The FSPCA Preventive Controls for Human Food course is a great fit for quality directors, managers, supervisors and practitioners who will be responsible for managing his or her company’s Food Safety Plan under FSMA.  This course will be held March 29th-31st, 2016, at Cherney Microbiological Services in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The cost is $800, but be sure to mention “Nelson Jameson” while registering to receive a 5% discount!  To register, please click HERE.


Nelson-Jameson Team Member Wins Scholarship

178f7b62-142f-4f5b-a385-9b8dffe132b2At Nelson-Jameson, we like to remain involved and in-the-know. We offer continued training for our employees, attend and exhibit at many trade shows, and are involved in networking, educational and philanthropic organizations that range from community-minded to industry-oriented. One of these trade associations to which Nelson-Jameson belongs is FISA, the Food Industry Suppliers Association.

FISA is trade group dedicated to promoting distribution in high purity industries, such as food and beverage, dairy, pharmaceutical, personal care and biotechnology. Its members are comprised of distributors and manufacturers who go to market through distribution. Nelson-Jameson has been involved with FISA since its inception more than 50 years ago, and we’ve found tremendous value in the networking and educational opportunities provided by FISA.

One of these opportunities involves the University of Innovative Distribution, a concentrated educational program focused on the unique needs of the wholesale distribution industry. Sponsored by FISA and other leading industrial trade organizations and in cooperation with Purdue University, UID provides a world-renowned educational experience to wholesale distribution professionals. FISA provides two annual scholarships to UID that are open to employees of member organizations, and we are proud to announce that a Nelson-Jameson team member has once again been awarded one of these scholarships.

Devon Nov15

Congratulations go to Devon Vogel, our Inventory Solutions Supply Chain Manager/MRO Product Manager, who will be attending UID this March via scholarship. Devon hopes “to use the information gained (at UID) to become a more efficient and innovative category manager, as well as (to become) a positive female role model for other women who are interested in going into the industry.” She’d like to use her educational experience to “contribute to (Nelson-Jameson)…and to providing solutions in the (overall) supply chain.” We couldn’t be prouder of Devon, and are excited to learn from her educational and developmental experiences at UID!

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Nelson-Jameson Inc., Kaestner LLC, and Valcour Process Technologies enter partnership to bring expanded offerings to the U.S. Cheese and Dairy Production Markets

MARSHFIELD, WIS., October 8, 2015 – Nelson-Jameson — one of the largest distributors to the US cheese production market — and its sister company Kaestner LLC — a field service, PM programs, and project solutions provider — are entering a strategic partnership with Valcour Process Technologies. Valcour specializes in offering process technologies, equipment, systems, lines, and project solutions for the cheese, yogurt, and dairy production markets.

Valcour will be working directly with the sales teams at Nelson-Jameson and Kaestner to expand their market reach and breadth of offering to customers. Kaestner will also offer services, spare parts, and preventative maintenance programs to Valcour to better serve their customers.

All three companies will work together to provide better solutions to cheese manufacturers.

Nelson-Jameson, Inc. has been an integrated supplier for the food industry since 1947. Product lines include safety & personnel, production & material handling, sanitation & janitorial, processing & flow control, laboratory & QA/QC, and bulk packaging & ingredients. The company is headquartered in Marshfield, Wisconsin, with other locations in Turlock, California; Twin Falls, Idaho; York, Pennsylvania; Dumas, Texas; and Chicago, Illinois. For more information visit, www.nelsonjameson.com.


Congratulations to Our 1000th Subscriber!

1000subscriberforblogDrumroll please…Nelson-Jameson has our 1000th e-newsletter subscriber!

Paula Tofil of Welcome Farms, LLC in East Aurora, New York, is the proud winner of a “swag bag” filled with Nelson-Jameson-branded items. Paula said that she signed up for our newsletter because Welcome Farms is “a very young goat farm that is looking to become a farmstead creamery”.

After retiring from a career in international business five years ago, she and her husband bought a 150-acre farm so that she could pursue her “passion for goat cheese”. They spent the first few years developing a herd of dairy goats to meet their ideals in regards of butterfat and temperament, and now have a herd of “approximately 50 purebred Nubian, Lamancha and Oberhasli girls working with (them) to provide delicious milk”.

Paula has spent her precious little down time studying cheesemaking. In nearly every case, Nelson-Jameson was recommended by her instructors as “THE place to get the supplies (she) would require once (she) makes the jump to cheesemaking on a commercial level”. She says that she has yet to place her first order but she can see from our catalog and website that most of her commercial plant needs will be filled by Nelson-Jameson, and is looking forward to a “long and mutually beneficial relationship with (us)”.

If you’re like Paula and want to learn more about supply chain happenings, food industry news and product promotions, sign up for Nelson-Jameson’s newsletter here.

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