Monthly Archives: April 2015

Tech Tip: Tips for Smooth-Running pH Testing

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Pick the right meter. A pH meter with more than minimum requirements may be the better option. Product requirements and regulations change with time. Meters with advanced features will allow for a wider range of testing and documentation of results.

Know the basics. The meter’s algorithm and displayed value expresses the amount of potential difference between the electrode’s reference to a sample being tested. During the process of electrode equilibrium (or end-point), a blockage or slowing of an electrode’s reference junction can impact the electrode’s ability to perform its task.Remember electrodes need to be rinsed and blotted before each test.

Maintenance is critical. Periodic and proper cleaning is required. Protein and other contaminants can build up on the electrode reference junction or sensing areas, often resulting in a longer time to endpoint. Cleaning solutions specifically designed for differing electrode styles are required.

For more Tech Tips, visit our Learning Center.

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Healthy People, Healthy Products, Healthy Planet

earth-day-foodToday is Earth Day, and our blog usually focuses around Nelson-Jameson’s social and environmental sustainability practices. This year, however, we’re taking a “big picture” approach, and exploring the overall food industry’s sustainability outlook. We’ll take a closer look at the ways in which food manufacturers, distributors, suppliers and retailers are taking steps to increase sustainability and reduce waste in the supply chain.

So, what is sustainability? Well, in this context it means that a business’s industrial practices and strategies create and maintain the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony while permitting the fulfillment of social and economic needs of present and future generations. For the food industry, sustainability is a major strategic issue for the entire food supply chain—agriculture, manufacturing, packing and distribution.  With an expected 60% increase in global food demand by the year 2050, the food industry is facing increasing pressure regarding raw materials, ingredient sourcing and food production in a competitive environment of constant supply chain optimization and control. Given the circumstances, achieving sustainable practices seems pretty daunting. So, what can be done?

One of the largest and most popular initiatives involves focusing on food waste. Food waste is food that is discarded or unusable, and it occurs at all levels of the supply chain. An estimated 40% of all food produced in the United States is never eaten. General food waste solutions focus on three overall strategies—Reduce, Recover and Recycle. Food waste can be reduced by improving product development, storage, packaging, procurement, marketing, labeling and cooking methods. It can be recovered by connecting potential food donors (food service providers, food retailers and food processors) to hunger-relief organizations. Finally, food waste can be recycled to feed animals or to create compost, bioenergy and natural fertilizers. In addition to the positive environmental and social implications, managing and reducing food waste is also advantageous to the food industry’s overall financial health. Food waste is estimated to cost the commercial food service industry in the US approximately $100 billion per year, US consumers approximately $43 billion per year and global food processors approximately $750 billion per year.

Another way in which the food industry is increasing sustainability is through strengthening the links between industry and agriculture. Agribusiness is said to build sustainable food systems by providing more nutritious, healthy and foods and assuring increased food security. Many food manufacturers are reevaluating their ingredient and raw material sourcing, and are finding that building direct relationships with local agribusiness is efficient from both a cost and energy standpoint.

Using environmentally-responsible packaging is another example of a strategy in which many sustainably-minded members of the food industry are engaging. Americans recycle at only an average rate of 34.5%, so the majority of food packaging ends up in landfills or as street litter. Therefore, there’s a general perception that the onus to reduce packaging waste and increase recycling is on the makers of packaged foods and beverages. Although packaging only makes up a small part of a product’s environmental impact, packaging heavily influences buying decisions—especially those of sustainably-minded consumers. Therefore, many manufacturers are seeking ways to reduce plastic and paper waste in their packaging, while finding ways to make it easier for consumers to recycle, reuse or compost that packaging.

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Nelson-Jameson, Inc. Updates Color-Coded Products Line

CCCoverMARSHFIELD, WIS., April 15, 2015  – Nelson-Jameson has updated their extensive collection of color-coded products for material handling, janitorial, safety, lab and processing applications, with the introduction of Ultra Safe Technology (UST) Brooms and Brushes.

The revolutionary new line of cleaning tools are supplied in the United States exclusively by Remco. With enhanced bristle security and unique bristle patterns, UST brooms and brushes help improve food safety and quality while minimizing the risk of contamination hazards.

Other new items have also been added to expand color selections on a variety of items. The color-coded line includes several colors, including white, red, yellow, blue, green, gray, brown, black, orange, purple and pink. The company’s new color-coded catalog features the complete color-coded line and is available on their website, nelsonjameson.com.

For more information or to request a flyer, please contact Customer Service at 800-826-8302 or visit nelsonjameson.com/colorcoded.

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Warehouse Addition Completed

Warehouse6AdditionThe 10,000 square foot warehouse addition to our Marshfield facility has been completed. Ground was broken in October 2014 on the expansion that is connected to the existing warehouse and includes six loading docks, two offices and 550 pallet positions. This addition brings the total warehouse space in Marshfield to over 2.2 million cubic feet.

Nelson-Jameson, Inc. has further warehouse space at the branch locations in California, Idaho, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

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Nelson-Jameson Pulls Up a Chair for this Round: BrewExpo America 2015

Source: Brewers Association

Source: Brewers Association

Over the past several years, Nelson Jameson, Inc. has had the good fortune to work with an array of breweries across the United States. Though historically situated in other areas of the food industry, NJ has come to be a trusted source of maintenance, safety, lab, cleaning, process, and material handling supplies for a wide array of customers, including breweries.

The craft brewing renaissance has exposed us to new customers, but thankfully our understanding of how to meet the needs and creative vision of craft and artisan cheesemakers has prepared us well for working with the craft beer industry.

We’ll be attending BrewExpo this year in Portland, Oregon, April 15th-April 17th and sitting in with our friends at Nasco, makers of the Whirl-Pak bag the afternoon of Thursday, April 16th from 1-5pm.

Please feel free to stop by the Nasco’s booth (#536) to check out an array of Whirl-Pak products throughout the show, and on the afternoon of the 16th to see how Nelson Jameson, Inc. might be able to help you reduce POs, while supplying a wide-array of competitively-priced products for your operation.

Or, to find out more about what we have available for your brewery, including products from suppliers like Nasco, 3M, Mettler-Toledo, Carlisle, Rubbermaid, and Remco, along with a whole host of other services and supplies, click here.

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